Season 3, Episode 1

Links Hall

October 16th, 2019

7:30 pm

Facebook Event

Reserve Tickets

curator

J e l l o

artists

Benjamín León / Erick Mejía “elpincherick”

Elliot Reza Emadian with significant contributions from Rachel Rizzuto

Tessa Ritchey

Angela Luem + Caitlin Rafferty

Sam Horning

Henry James Walker

Omar Khalil Dyette

Sarah Stearn

Born in Chicago, Illinois, on August 29, 1989. Since age 6
showed skills in the area of ​​dance, starting at the level
elementary school in Morelos with Mexican folk dance; so in the
adolescence moving to musical theater, classical dance, Jazz, and
Currently contemporary dance. So in movement techniques
alternatives such as: break dance, capoeira, juggling, clown,
propelled, butoh dance, among others.
He has participated in different dance projects as a dancer
principal and co-creator in companies such as: La Trouppe Stilo OX,
Ensemble Dance UAEM, IL-LaDanse and Changos Dance, with the
which have traveled several parts of Mexico. Companies like:
Foramen M. Ballet, dropshift dance project, visceral dance Company,
Alexis Zanetti, etc. Festivals like the Art Lab Show in Vancouver,
Canada and Raw showcase in Chicago, USA. So in programs
national and state television (Televisa and Tv Azteca).
Currently working with the artistic community in the state of
Morelos, Mexico.
Graduated from the Morelense Center of the Arts. Exceptional leader with
talent for learning, development and application again
acquired knowledge, both in dance and in different
activities in the artistic field or referring to the body. Knowledge
technicians acquired in the aesthetic lines of body expression in
areas such as modeling (artistic and fashion), as well as the scene.
Obtained both in Mexico and in other countries.

“LUDUS” ¿How many times when you laugh you cry?

by

Benjamín León
Erick Mejía “elpincherick”

featuring

Erick Mejía “el pinche Erick”

with music

Ljova – Less

Work of contemporary dance of small format, unipersonal that proposes a playful, instinctive, animal and gestural movement. Inspired, researched and developed from the analysis of the poem “Laughing Crying” by the Mexican writer Juan de Dios Peza, in which, the development of the work follows to some extent the narrative of the poem. In this work a universal character is created that struggles internally with his own life, in a brief masquerade where he tries to explain something that he cannot explain, the experience of the character through different emotional moments, leads the viewer to moments of confusion where the sadness, happiness, grace, melancholy, madness, frustration become a movement that expresses an individual-personal catharsis where the only reality is the unreal of life itself.

Elliot Reza Emadian is a gender-nonconforming interdisciplinary artist, teacher, and scholar currently a working as a graduate student at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. Their work occurs in the intersection of dance and choreography, video art and editing, sound and music, light and photography, and popular culture. See elliotreza.com for more.

Here we go again

by

Elliot Reza Emadian with significant contributions from Rachel Rizzuto

featuring

Rachel Rizzuto with significant contributions from Elliot Reza Emadian

with music

“How to Be a Heartbreaker” written by Marina Diamandis, “Boys Boys Boys” written by Stefani Germonatta and RedOne, “God is a Woman” written by Ariana Grande, Max Martin, Savan Kocheta, Rickard Goransson, and Ilya, “Man! I Feel Like a Woman” written by Shania Twain and Mutt Lange, “Hot n Cold” written by Katy Perry, Dr. Luke, and Max Martin, “Call Me Maybe” written by Carly Rae Jepsen and Tavish Crowe, “Your Body is a Wonderland” written by John Mayer, “Single Ladies” written by Beyoncé, “The Dream”, Kuk Harrell, and Tricky Stewart, “Natural Woman” written by Carole King and Gerry Goffin, “Copacabana” written by Barry Manilow, Jack Feldman, and Bruce Sussman, “What the world needs now is love” written by Hal David and composed by Burt Bacharach, “Proud Mary” written by John Fogerty, “Ly Cygne” written by Camille Saint-Saëns.

elliotreza.com
Many thanks to our whole community at University of Illinois for supporting the development of this work, and to all of the artists and producers of J e l l o S3E1 for creating this incredible evening! Special thanks to Rachel for believing in and whole-bodily committing to this work for a whole year now, and to Michelle Burns for trekking along with us to test new ways of accessing it.

Tessa Ritchey was born and raised in Walworth, Wisconsin, where she trained at The Dance Factory. She graduated from The University of Iowa in 2018 with a B.F.A in Dance Performance and Choreography. While in College Tessa apprenticed for Dance in the Parks, in Chicago, where she was able to perform and help run the shows. Along with performance experience, she has had multiple of her own choreographic works produced by the university, one of which was selected to perform at the 2018 ACDA North Central Conference. After college, Tessa has had her work presented at the MADCO 2’s Dare To Dance, Trifecta’s A New Light, the Iowa Dance Festival, SMUSH Moves Vol. 7 and Emergence.

al(one)

by

Tessa Ritchey

featuring

Margo Korn
Nell Ritchey

with music

Pet (Headz), Connection, and Chewing (Headz) by Scanner; soundscore by Tessa Ritchey

Angela and Caitlin met in 2012 when they started dancing with MegLouise. With MegLouise they created interactive installations and works where the audience enjoys proximity to the performance through inclusion in creation, activation, distribution. Angela and Caitlin’s work is inspired by all of their influencers and interests. Current improvised performances may manifest as dance improvisation, detailed movement experiments, live movement or recorded memories and manipulations of bodies, mood, space or time. They enjoy experimenting with video work and outside adventures.

Record(er)

by

Angela Luem + Caitlin Rafferty

featuring

Caitlin Rafferty and Angela Luem

Record(er) is a process performance. We would like you, dear audience member to be part of this process. To do that we suggest that you take out your recording device; phone or camera, stand up, leave your seat and come into the space with us. We ask that you please record us as we dance. Sometimes we’ll dance together, sometimes alone and sometimes apart. What you decide to see and capture is up to you. We want to discover what you see.
We ask that you then submit your video to us be emailing it to jellovideoalcr@gmail.com or giving us your email for a link to download your video or meet us after the show to airdrop it off.
We will use some of your footage to compile a dance film from tonights work. The film will be shown on December 3rd at j e l l o’s next performance at elastic arts. This is our first time doing this. We’re nervous too! We’re all in this together. Let’s take a breath and have fun!

Sam Horning (he/him/his) is engaged in social change as a dancer, facilitator, artist, administrator, choreographer, curator, organizer, collaborator, amateur rock-climber, and life-partner to John where they reside in the Edgewater neighborhood of Chicago, IL. He is the Projects & Residencies Manager and a Partnering Artist with Dance Exchange and believes wholeheartedly in Dance Exchange’s mission that every body can and should dance. He is currently a performer in Liz Lerman’s Wicked Bodies. His work has been supported by the D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities and he was a recipient of their FY18 and FY19 Arts and Humanities Fellowship Program.
Sam is currently in development for I Object alongside Juliana Ponguta which explores our relationship to objects throughout history and now, and across spatial, liminal, political, spiritual, and energetic dimensions. In I Object we create temporary embodied and constructed worlds that speak to our singular and collective participation amongst a changing material world. A duet version of the project will be presented at Dance Place’s Contemporary Viewpoints on December 7-8, 2019.
Sam has performed and taught nationally and internationally and holds a BFA from Wayne State University. He is also an E/INFP-T and a Pisces. For further highlights of Sam’s eclectic career, please visit his CV here.

with

by

Sam Horning

featuring

Sam Horning

Henry James Walker is a physical theatre artist based in Chicago, currently developing material mime & clown material. He leads monthly workshops in various forms, sharing his focus on honesty in performance, presence, and the use of silence and stillness. You might have seen him last performing at Links Hall in June, at Nasty, Brutish, & Short: a puppet cabaret.
Henry is one year new to Chicago, and is currently seeking performing, teaching, and collaborating opportunities around the city.
www.henryjameswalker.com

MIMECYCLE

by

Henry James Walker

featuring

Henry James Walker

with music

n/a

Mimecycle: the unspoken journey.
www.henryjameswalker.com
www.henryjameswalker.com/mimecycle.html
Special thanks to: Emily Harvey, Richie Schiraldi, Adrian Danzig, Charlie Weber, & Erik Siegling.

Omar Khalil Dyette is a Chicago-based movement artist blurring the lines between visual and performance art. Fusing dance, photography and writing, they uncover some the sur/realities of life as a Black queer femme to create visions of freedom and power.

TO GET FREE
A Mantra / a motive / a purpose

by

Omar Khalil Dyette

featuring

Omar Khalil Dyette

with music

Scrub (It’s not me It’s you) by Joey LaBeija

IG: avez.luz

Sarah Stearn is a movement artist, native of Chicago, and graduate from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She visualizes, processes, and understands movement and choreography through internalizing what she sees and experiences around her. She moves and makes to stimulate the senses, calm the mind, and trust. Improvisation, asking questions, change, and music lie at the heart of her practice.

dreamscape/The Body Beautiful

by

Sarah Stearn

featuring

Sarah Stearn

with music

Hide – FKA Twigs

dreamscape/The Body Beautiful is an excerpt of research that Sarah dove into while at the Plank Road Artist in Residence program at the Farwell House in Frederick, IL. The film and performance are two separate studies of three, the third being a collection of collages. In this work, Sarah attempts to reconstruct the perception of the female form in dance. In performance, she grapples with sensations deep within her muscles, as well as on the surface of her skin and hair. What do these feelings mean about her body, as a woman in society? How is this movement perceived by an outsider? How is it perceived by Sarah herself?
By juxtaposing film and performance, Sarah hopes to reimagine the body and dance as textural, overlapping, and contrasting yet cohesive.
Talk to me after the show! I’m looking for feedback to continue developing this work.